Great service and net promoter score

Word of mouth

Word of mouth

Good service leaves a positive and lasting impression. Unfortunately we all too often end up telling friends and colleagues of the poor service we have received.

My shopping experiences this Christmas have been really quite good: service levels have been good; stock availability better than expected; till queues well managed.

My star retail sales person in the last week is Geoff Noronha at Dawsons http://www.dawsons.co.uk/ in Reading. He delivered useful advice and his efficiency and combined good humour made the experience a pleasure.

Great service leaves a more marked impression than advertising, but of course you have to get the customer in the shop first!

Thinking of this reminds of Net Promoter Score http://www.netpromoter.com/ (NPS). It really is a simple but effective business metric:-

Companies obtain their Net Promoter Score by asking customers a single question (usually, “How likely is it that you would recommend us to a friend or colleague?”). Based on their responses, customers can be categorised into one of three groups: Promoters, Passives, and Detractors.

In the net promoter framework, Promoters are viewed as valuable assets that drive profitable growth because of their repeat/increased purchases, longevity and referrals, while Detractors are seen as liabilities that destroy profitable growth because of their complaints, reduced purchases/defection and negative word-of-mouth.

Companies calculate their Net Promoter Score by subtracting their % Detractors from their % Promoters.

Proponents of the Net Promoter approach claim the score can be used to motivate an organisation to become more focused on improving products and services for customers. They further claim that a company’s relative Net Promoter Score (its score relative to competitors) correlates with revenue growth relative to competitors.

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